Day 22: Favorite Villain From A Book

First of all, I am skipping the prompt for day 21 which pertained to discussing your favorite childhood books. Well, I discussed them already with the prompt for day 14 (favorite childhood authors).

The next prompt is really difficult for me to answer. Villain- well, if truth be said, I did not find the villains/antagonists impressive from the books I have read. May be there are some great villains in many books out there, but I haven’t read them.

If I consider it again, I would consider the governments to be the worst villains. I have read many Sidney Sheldon novels and in almost each one of them, the government plays a negative role.

Like in The Doomsday Conspiracy, a section of the government conspires to kill a number of people and send their agent with wrong information that he had to only look for them so that the government could just talk to them. If I say anything more, the whole story will be revealed. And in The Sands of Time, the Spanish government is all set to kill the Basque rebels due to which lives of certain nuns also come into jeopardy.

I think the governments do make good villains. Because they are easy to loath by the readers because of the fact that they are already are fed up of their respective governments. What do you think about it?

I haven’t got anything else to discuss in this post. That is all. Who is your favorite villain? Tell me a good one so that I could read that book and start liking him/her myself.

Day 15: Your Five Favorite Characters

A very hard question. I like so many characters. I don’t know which of them are my favorites; so I am discussing some characters that I liked (again, in no particular order):

1. Mariam from A Thousand Splendid Suns: She is sort of a submissive character who adheres to the male-dominant society throughout her life but when it gets unbearable, she revolts and she becomes mighty powerful. It was the change in her character with time along with her ultimate sacrifice which makes her a very powerful character,

2. Tridib from The Shadow Lines: He is a mysterious character who is kept to be quite suspenseful throughout the book. He is mature, understanding and a master story-teller. He is instantly likable. Even though he holds a small part in the book, he is significant to the story.

3. Margo Roth Spiegelman from Paper Towns: She is another mysterious character and the basis of the plot of the novel. She is a free soul who thinks deep and make such decisions to live a life, breaking the social norms. She is a person I would like to be myself.

4. Holden Caulfield from The Catcher in the Rye: Here I am mentioning once again, one of the most criticized characters. He is some one with a distinct personality with individual thoughts which are sometimes confusing, yet profound. The character development is really commendable in this classic by J.D. Salinger.

5. Balram Halwai from The White Tiger: The protagonist who is also the antagonist from this Man Booker Prize (2008) winner book is some one I wouldn’t like at all as a person but would have understood him and his actions to some extent, which given any degree of circumstance were still not justifiable. But I do like the character sketch which is successful in bringing to life this character. I would recommend you to read this book to know this complex character who is just a common man but a lot more than that.

That is all.

Day 13: Your favorite author

Well, this is like asking about your favorite book.

No, I don’t have any favorite author. Yes, I have many favorite authors.

That is all to be said. That is what says everything.

Okay, so I am going to make a list of all those authors I liked (in no particular order) and what I liked about them:

1. J.d. Salinger- Direct straightforward approach in writing

2. John Green- Understanding of teenage and true narration of coming of age

3. J.K. Rowling- Weaving a superb fantasy world

4. Sidney Sheldon- Hard-paced thriller; page turner content

5. Stephen King- Perfect blend of mysticism and spookiness

6. Jeffrey Archer- Wonderful depictions of a person’s psychology

7. Kathryn Stockett- Joyful writing about a serious issue

8. Marcia Willet- Dramatic and heart-touching writing

9. Dan Brown- Symbols and conspiracy theory

10. Kazuo Ishiguro- Life stories bared; what else to say!?

11. Rick Riordan- Mythological content presented for the young ; easy to understand and enjoy

12. Suzzane Collins- Planning and plotline

13.  Mitch Albom- Understanding life for all its complexities and accepting its end

14. Khaled Hosseini- Heart wrenching tales of unfortunate people, tangled in the web of war

15. Paulo Coelho- Spirituality and metaphors

16. Amitav Ghosh- Words you would treasure; characters you won’t forget

17. Jhumpa Lahiri- Inspiring with the tales of family and mature relationships

18. Sylvia Plath- Raw emotions portrayed in a way that creates a gaping hole in the chest

19. John Grisham- Stories that leave a message and keep you entertained

20. Stephen Chbosky- Gently caressing story, speaking of the wonders of friendship